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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
would be eric schmidt meeting with the founders of google up there. that would reportedly one of the big factors. what is it that makes burning man such a haven for that kind of connection? >> several factors. you think about the culture of silicon valley. eric schmidt had been some interesting papers. he had been making the point that so much of the tech industry is project-based learning. google gives people time off to do what they want. they give them time to explore and hang out with other people, outside of the framework of this more structured enterprise. burning man, from the very beginning is project-based learning. it attracts people from every demographic that you can think of, every category. so you have to, potentially, encyclopedic knowledge assembled at this place. and the natural way to learn is project-based. scholarship is fine, academic models can be useful for certain things, but human beings tend to learn by engaging in project- based learning. if you look at the desert -- well, here is an example. i was on a tour for the black rock arts foundation. we went to variou
't eric schmidt say it was the mother of all battles? i mean, look, everybody wants to be apple. this is a surprise though, doc. the stock ran up so much going in to earnings and there was so much optimism. a stealth rally as we referred to it almost every day. >> yep. and just as we were saying top of the show on "fast money," the stock was up 30% for the quarter, roughly. that was most -- if not all of the year's gains. and the outperformance in this last quarter was notable. the fact that it was either a loading problem where they loaded this release -- rather than the fat finger, they loaded it to be released, at for instance, 4:30 eastern and instead it hits the street at 12:30 eastern time, that's a big problem. there will be a lot of explaining. you and i will be talking about it on "fast money" tonight, we know that. >> jon, what about the nasdaq site itself? bertha said there were some glitches down there, that they were getting a sense of. what impact might this have on the nasdaq site and its ability to process these trades? what do you think? >> well, i noticed, sue,
is on nike and then you look at nike and eric schmidt was at apple. they're a tightly woven board of directors. it's amazing. >> it is. and the problem that really is happening, we're starting to see the roots of this right now, you know, in the post-enron era we had sarbanes-oxley come out and all these corporate governance reforms. but what they didn't do -- they increased accountability and transparency, no question, but what they didn't do was improve the candidate pool. and we haven't done anything to really -- the problem that happens at the public company level is most people think, well, we're looking for board members, we're going to keep the pool to existing public company directors and existing public company officers. >> mark rogers, i have to stop you there. all good show stuff on sarbanes-oxley. thank you for being here. "press: here" will be back in just a minute. >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm mike inouye, traffic anchor here ought nbc bay area. folks coming into the city for the bay area's big weengd. we have all this activity scheduled today includi
your favorite tablet on twitter or facebook. >>> from eric schmidt's google to reed hoffman, "outfront" has taken you behind the scenes of some of the world's most innovative ideas and most successful entrepreneurs. what sets tonight's idea apart from those we usually profile is what you're looking at right there. that's the young man we had on the show. he was 11 years old when he came up with his idea. not only that, but his idea caught the attention of one of the most revolutionary companies on the planet, apple. earlier, i spoke with charlie hutchison and asked him how he did it. >> well, i've always really been interested in computers and so when i decided to make an app i was thinking about what i would want to do and i decided i wanted an easy way to be able to follow all of my friends' accounts on flickr and see their photos. so that was the basic idea and then it kind of evolved from there. now it has a geocoded photos and recent photos but that w the basic idea. >> so i have to be honest with you. a lot of people might say to me i have this idea, i really want to be able to f
's chairman eric schmidt faced tough questions last year while testifying in front of a senate subcommittee. >> -- seems to suggest it favors google products. is that true? >> as i said, first, i disagree with that characterization. what i said over and over again was we're trying to get to the right answer. >> reporter: according to some competitors, they're serving up answers advantageous to google. appearing at the same hearing, jeremy stopleman, ceo of yelp, which enables users to search and review local businesses, a service also provided by google itself. >> what we're most concerned about is that google is no longer satisfied with pointing users to the best content anywhere on the web it can be found. instead, it seems they prefer to send users to the most profitable content on the web which is naturally their own. >> reporter: critics might point to the following example. say you're looking for chinese food in washington, d.c. at the top of the page, google lists many restaurants with links to reviews. google reviews. click on any one of them, and you're taken to a page on google pl
eric schmidt was the key person. >> okay. all right. here's larry page right now. let's listen to what he's saying. >> here you go, larry. >> thank you. hello, everyone. thanks for joining us. it's great to be on the call today and to share our progress since we last spoke six months ago. as you can hear, my voice is still hoarse. i'll keep my remarks reasonably short. i'm sorry for the scramble earlier today. as our printers have said, they had sent the release just a bit early. we had a strong quarter. i'm really happy with our business. revenue was up 45% year on year and at just 14 years old, we cleared our first $14 billion revenue quarter. not bad for a teenager. today we live in the world of abundance. abundant information and abundant computing. most of us carry at least one device all the time every day. in fact, many of us feel naked without our smart phone. mobile commerce and mobile search queries are growing dramatically across the world. when we use these devices interchangeably, depending on our situation. i switch between my nexus phone, my nexus 7 tablet and my new chr
is the attraction? >> i think the attraction is the social media side of it. and even eric schmidt of googleal who was a little late to the party is a great believer in the social media. and i think it is live, well and moving ahead. i am kind of an admirer of the young fellow who heads up facebook. >> so in terms of facebook i know you like the management and you like mark zuckerburg and what he has done. would you buy the stock? >> i don't really know enough about the stock to say that. i've sort of been lucky on that some of the younger people here that have a private investment group were very early in facebook and got in it many years ago. i'm part of their partnership so it's been -- i don't know enough about it, the pricing now. >> as sort of a student of investing and wall street for so many years were you surprised of the debacle with that ipo? company has lost 50% of its value, real sort of botched ipo from the get go. >> it really was botched up. but in the sense it was symbolic of what hot deals had been for years. you know, there was people buying it. it is kind of a greed game. in a
prospekts. eric schmidt says more and more growth fund managers are taking interest in biotech where earnings are not correlated with the macro environment. ubs writes that alexion is a significant double-digit growth driver but uses the orphan drug model where pricing and reimbursement are insulated, the biotech is up a whopping 400% over the past three years. keep in mind this is a speculative takeout target. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will joi
this incredible amount of information we produce today. if you, you know, we all know from eric schmidt's quote, if all the information was created from 2003, this is more or less what we produced yesterday and today, over the past couple of days. there's another way, data i heard recently from singapore a few weeks ago was, well, big data is also -- you cannot put it in an excel spread sheet. but this big data has big consequences in cities, and that's what i would like to talk to you about today. call it big urban data. now, our cities over the past few years have been layered with many different types of digital information. and because of that the way we understand them and the way we can respond to them, we believe, is changing dramatically. we can collect a lot of information from our cities, and then we can process the information and respond to that information. i rust wanted to make an example of -- i just wanted to make an example of something that is happening like formula one. if you think about formula one 10, 15 years ago, if you wanted to win a race, you needed a good car and a g
data. a data is about this incredible amount of information we produced today. we know from eric schmidt, the information was produced from the beginning of humanity. this is more less what we produced yesterday and today. the definition, big data is also, you cannot put it in a spreadsheet. this has big consequences and this is what i would like to talk to you about today. call it big urban data. our cities of the past few years have been a layered with many types of visual information. because of that, the way we understand them and the way we can respond to them is changing dramatically. collecting information from our cities and we can process the information and process it later. in other fields like formula one, think about formula 110 or 15 years ago. if you wanted to win a race, you needed a good car and a good driver. actually today, if you want to win a race, you need something like this -- a system made of thousands and thousands of sensors connected to those computers. decisions are made in real time. that's the same that's happening today in our cities. if you are an
. if you, you know, we all know from eric schmidt's quote, if all the information was created from 2003, this is more or less what we produced yesterday and today, over the past couple of days. there's another way, data i heard recently from singapore a few weeks ago was, well, big data is also -- you cannot put it in an excel spread sheet. but this big data has big consequences in cities, and that's what i would like to talk to you about today. call it big urban data. now, our cities over the past few years have been layered with many different types of digital information. and because of that the way we understand them and the way we can respond to them, we believe, is changing dramatically. we can collect a lot of information from our cities, and then we can process the information and respond to that information. i rust wanted to make an example of -- i just wanted to make an example of something that is happening like formula one. if you think about formula one 10, 15 years ago, if you wanted to win a race, you needed a good car and a good driver. you needed physical, solid things.
asking. i think that's an important push. focus on what google does with u2. eric schmidt was very clear in the. he said his testimony response, they treat youtube as an outside property. they crawl index and rank. that's what they could be doing with regard to google+. we don't seem to be doing the. if you haven't seen the browser ballot in the e.u. this is what happens when you turn on a windows sound machine for the first time in the e.u. you get a choice of rousers. there was a resolution that came out of the e.u. case against microsoft. there's some discussion in the paper that we can't share the top link, for after all only one toppling. i think that's wrong. we can share very much in a statistical sense. when google sees 10,000 searches for hyde park restaurants it can return at whatever fine level of granularity we want searches that this search is going to be linked to yelp reviews and this will be linked to google reviews. we can do that at whatever level of granularity we want to if we don't think every search return has to be the same. so i think the remedy issue here is if w
. so eric schmidt was very clear in that in his senate testimony response. they treat youtube as an outside property. they crawl, index and rank, right? that's what they could be doing with regard to google plus. they don't seem to be doing that. the browser ballot. if you haven't seen the browser ballot in the e.u. this is what happens when you turn on a windows seven machine and the first time in the e.u. you get a choice of browsers. that was resolution that came out of an e.u. case against -- against microsoft. there's some discussion in the paper that we can't share the top link. because after all only one top link. i think that's wrong. right? we can share it very much in a statistical sense, right? when google sees 10,000 searches for hyde park restaurants, it can return at whatever fine level of granularity we want. searches that this search is going to be linked to yelp reviews and this search will be linked to google reviews. we can do that at whatever level of granularity we want to if we don't think that every search return has to be the same. so i think the remedy
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)